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Porting, Using a Mill

General engine tech -- Drag Racing to Circle Track

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Dave Koehler
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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by Dave Koehler » Sat May 30, 2020 1:02 pm

Since you don't have to contend with a left - right valve arrangement and you have cut them all the same way you only need to test one cylinder.
I would wait on testing until you get one chamber and ports where you want it.
Show the flow bench owner the money. Otherwise you will be perceived as just another mooch who doesn't understand that the testing is not done in a microwave.

Don't let the negatives slow you down. We all or at least a lot of us started the same way.
The first way may turn out wrong but you learn as you go. That's a good thing BTW. :D
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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by frnkeore » Sat May 30, 2020 6:36 pm

I spent some time with Carnuts picture, that he sectioned the intake port, on his C6 head. I have a program, that will scale a measurement and after I adjusted the the valve seat, to parallel, I set the valve seat opening at 1.94 and drew perpendicular lines at .75, off the center line. That is the path of the 1.5" end mill. There should not be more than .015 error in what I've done.

It looks like there is plenty of material left after the end mill was done. I have to do the same to the exhaust port and see how that looks.

I would like to tank Carnut for providing such a good thread on his port work on his C6 head. I'm hoping he will chime in on this.

PS,
I have found a flow bench but, I can't be there while they are tested.
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Carnut1
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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by Carnut1 » Sat May 30, 2020 8:24 pm

I am reading along and glad someone is getting some info out of one of my old threads. You stated these had no core shift but without a good ultrasonic thickness gauge that may bite you. Lots of the flow gain is in the ssr. I needed to check bowl thickness just cutting the bottom seat angles between valves. Intake bowl side facing exhaust. Thanks, Charlie
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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by frnkeore » Sun May 31, 2020 1:53 pm

Charlie, because of your experience, grinding into the water jacket, I'm going to be conservative. I'm using smaller valves and my plan is to make as large a SSR as possible and lay it back as little as possible. My hope is that it will work with the roof radius I created with the ball end mill. Your section pictures are extremely helpful on that SSR shape.

I also have some help in how to do the manual porting. As a machinist, I hate working with cast iron and I'll hate even more, the work with a burr.

The heads are out getting Stellite exhaust seats put in them so, it will be about a week before I can do any more.

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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by NebrRex » Sun May 31, 2020 11:56 pm

This is how I done a Ford 2.3 head for my ranger.
It saved a lot of time and made it easier to keep the ports matched when I finished them by hand.




.

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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by smeg » Fri Jun 05, 2020 4:12 am

Boy, that was painful for me watching that, why is the feed so slow? Your not making chips, your making dust.

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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by Dave Koehler » Fri Jun 05, 2020 7:52 am

smeg wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 4:12 am
Boy, that was painful for me watching that, why is the feed so slow? Your not making chips, your making dust.
I will take a shot at this. He is using a flycutter. He can't crank the rpm up without the mill shaking. He then backs it down to stop the shaking which leads to slowing the feed to get a "acceptable" surface finish. A V mill doesn't have enough mass tied with a R8 spindle to get after it. The interrupted cut does not help either.
Super slow cut can also be the result of the type and style of insert used. That is an experiment thing for every V mill owner.
It's no money maker time wise but what a V mill owner has to do to get it done. The end result is what counts. Happy gasket, happy owner.
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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by smeg » Fri Jun 05, 2020 6:43 pm

Yes thinking back I started out that way. I made my own large circular cutter with 2 opposite tips, one slightly further out and .002" higher than the finishing tip. the first would cut the bulk and the second would take a skim, finish was good and you could feed twice as fast as one cutting tip.
The only thing wrong with a V mill is the way the table drops going end to end, but hey yes you have to get it done.

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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by mag2555 » Tue Jun 16, 2020 7:00 am

Anyone ever cut up the E7TE Intake port, is there water in the roof ?

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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by frnkeore » Tue Jun 16, 2020 1:28 pm

These pictures are from Carnut's C6 head. I'm not sure how much different the E7's are but, I would think that the one spot, in the roof would bare being careful.
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Brian W
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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by Brian W » Tue Jun 23, 2020 12:24 pm

I use a mill to do some port work. It's an old tracer mill though.


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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by frnkeore » Tue Jun 23, 2020 3:13 pm

Not a bad idea. They are actually called a Profiler.

I still have my Bridgeport, like yours but, with twin cutting heads. I've used them since the '70's but, not much, at all since the late '90's. CNC took their place.

To tell you the truth I hadn't enough though of using it but, it could be beneficial on contouring the bowls. Slower than CNC's but, just as good, at least w/o having a 5 axis.

I may try it but, the setup time will be extensive for me.

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Re: Porting, Using a Mill

Post by frnkeore » Wed Jun 24, 2020 8:20 pm

I bought a new sonic tester and after the learning curve. The thinnest place I found, was .172, at the back of the ex bowl. Same place on the intake was .190 and the front of the SSR is .206. I couldn't get to far back on the SSR but, it was thinning and I found a .178 spot, about a 1/4 back of that. It's very hard and frustrating, to measure inside of the ports. I had to put a radius on the probe, before I could get any reading, at all and then, I found grease worked best to get a better contact.

So, as of now, I got plenty to start on with the burr.

PS,
I'm getting a lot of excellent, invaluable, help, from one of our members here. Hopefully, I haven't messed up the ex to much, to start with.

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