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This morning...

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Kevin Johnson
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Re: This morning...

Post by Kevin Johnson » Wed Sep 04, 2019 6:59 am

Thanks, Randy.

We are now stocked up on water and petrol.

GLHS60
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Re: This morning...

Post by GLHS60 » Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:55 am

Any weather updates??

Hoping you are safe, not much on the news here about your area.

Thanks
Randy
Sherwood Park
Alberta,Canada

Kevin Johnson
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Re: This morning...

Post by Kevin Johnson » Sat Sep 07, 2019 1:59 am

GLHS60 wrote:
Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:55 am
Any weather updates??

Hoping you are safe, not much on the news here about your area.

Thanks
Randy
https://www.baynews9.com/fl/tampa/weather/radar is what we use to follow it. The Tampa area is the lightning strike capitol of the US so thunderstorms are normal during hurricane season.

GLHS60
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Re: This morning...

Post by GLHS60 » Sun Sep 08, 2019 11:59 pm

I talked to my folks today in eastern Canada (PEI) and the storm has passed by them.

Power was out for about 12 hrs and a few branches etc blowing around but its OK now.

I'm assuming you're still safe and sound with not much damage?

Kind regards to Samantha

Thanks
Randy
Sherwood Park
Alberta,Canada

Kevin Johnson
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Re: This morning...

Post by Kevin Johnson » Mon Sep 09, 2019 5:39 am



I am glad your family is safe.

GLHS60 wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 11:59 pm
I talked to my folks today in eastern Canada (PEI) and the storm has passed by them.

Power was out for about 12 hrs and a few branches etc blowing around but its OK now.

I'm assuming you're still safe and sound with not much damage?

Kind regards to Samantha

Thanks
Randy

Kevin Johnson
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Re: This morning...

Post by Kevin Johnson » Mon Sep 09, 2019 5:44 am

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49624138



I am glad your family is safe.

GLHS60 wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 11:59 pm
I talked to my folks today in eastern Canada (PEI) and the storm has passed by them.

Power was out for about 12 hrs and a few branches etc blowing around but its OK now.

I'm assuming you're still safe and sound with not much damage?

Kind regards to Samantha

Thanks
Randy

enigma57
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Re: This morning...

Post by enigma57 » Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:30 am

Kevin Johnson wrote:
Mon Jul 01, 2019 9:20 am
Most recently, Samantha met a young woman who was wearing an analog watch (i.e. having a dial). She had to count the positions to determine the time as she was never taught to do this at a glance in school or by her parents. Apparently the local schools are now all using digital numeric displays. From personal experience I can assure you that local hospitals and other medical facilities still use analog clocks on the walls.

How absolutely mind-boggling scary is that?
Kevin, I can relate. A couple years ago, I was trying to explain to a young fellow by E-mail how to static time an engine out in a farmer's field after pulling the distributor and replacing it along with a new cap, rotor and plug wires.

Walked him through pulling #1 plug (after removing coil wire), having a buddy bump the engine over a few degrees at a time until pressure blew his thumb off the empty spark plug hole (he was mortified at the thought of this) and then (with coil wire removed and ignition switched off) either rocking the car in gear or grabbing the fan belt and rotating the crankshaft back to where the timing mark was where he wanted it (10 degrees BTDC in this instance).

This engine had breaker points. So once he had the crankshaft on compression stroke for #1 piston and at his desired timing...... I had him (with coil wire still removed) turn ignition switch on and rotate the distributor against the direction the rotor turned (to take up any slack in timing chain) and when the points opened, to tighten down the distributor where the points arced, then turn ignition switch off again. Later, I wondered how he had managed this, but more about that further on.

We got through that OK, so after replacing #1 plug, the next step was going to be putting the new plug wires on. I had him make a mark on the distributor where the rotor was pointing and install the cap. Then make the hole nearest his mark #1 and run his first plug wire from there to #1 plug.

So far, so good. Explained how the cylinders were numbered and had him mark them with a pencil on his valve covers. Told him to read the firing order (it was stamped on his intake manifold) and begin placing his wires in the same rotational direction as his rotor turned.

That's when everything went to crap. He hadn't paid attention to which way the rotor turned. So I told him it was a Chevy and his rotor would turn in a clockwise direction...... And to just follow the firing order and put his plug wires on in that rotational direction. Went over it several times. Even went far afield and got into why water will rotate in one direction going down a drain in the Northern hemisphere and in the opposite direction in the Southern hemisphere. Just couldn't get through to him. ](*,)

Finally had him look at a clock on the wall and told him to follow the direction the second hand rotated. Still no go. He asked me what a second hand was. Thought 'second hand' meant something old or previously used. Which it does, but that is not what I meant.

Only then did I understand that he had only seen clocks and watches with digital numeric displays. He had no idea what I was talking about when I said 'clockwise' or 'counterclockwise'. Once I figured that out, I had him pull his coil wire and his distributor cap again and have his buddy bump the engine over a few degrees so he could see which direction the rotor turned. Distributor was locked down and he had #1 plug wire terminal marked already, so no harm done rotating engine.

Following that, he wired it up and it fired up straight away. Then checked timing with a light and was within 2 degrees of where he wanted it. But man...... I was beginning to wonder if I had gotten so old that I had lost the ability to make myself understood in English any longer! :shock:

Best regards,

Harry

Kevin Johnson
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Re: This morning...

Post by Kevin Johnson » Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:05 am

"Righty tighty, lefty loosey" ... then he will tell you how he broke off a bunch of the wheel studs on his old Chrysler doing that. :lol:

enigma57
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Re: This morning...

Post by enigma57 » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:44 pm

Ah yes...... Had a few old MOPARs with those funky lug studs and lug nuts with the 'L' stamped in them. :wink:

These are left and right hand lug nuts for a '33 Plymouth......

Image

Image

Best regards,

Harry

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Re: This morning...

Post by chevyfreak » Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:01 am

We use the metric system but my grandfather used both metric and imperial. So i know both.
Way back after i finished school i helped a buddy of mine with his father's car. Old chevy inline. Still had a hardline for fuel hose. So he needs to take it off and takes a 13mm spanner. It slips. I told him he needs to use a 1/2" spanner. (Can see his lifeless face even today. ) So after a couple of seconds he replies, "is that the 1 over 2?". #-o
He never learned about the imperial system even though his father used it.
Or the automotive engineers these day is i tell them i want to cut the deck 20thou, They got no idea what i mean by deck and ask what i mean by 20 thou.
Once had a crank that i wanted to cut way smaller and offset grind to increase the stroke. Std were 2.55" and i wanted it down to 2" and increase the stroke by some margin. He could not fathom what i wanted to do and why, Never went back there.

Chevyfreak.
Bowtie for life

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